A New Reimagined MoMA Presents the Collection 1940s - 1970s

Sunday, November 3, 2019
A New Reimagined MoMA Presents the Collection 1940s - 1970s

Arranged in a loosely chronological order, each of the 23 galleries on the fourth floor explores an individual topic. A gallery may be devoted to an artist, a specific medium or discipline, a particular place in a moment in time or a shared creative idea. These presentations are conceived by teams of curators from all fields and at all levels of seniority collaborating closely to share expertise and viewpoints.

Image: Jackson Pollock. One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8' 10" × 17' 5 5/8" (269.5 × 530.8cm). Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). Conservation was made possible by the Bank of America Art Conservation Project. © 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

 

Arranged in a loosely chronological order, each of the 23 galleries on the fourth floor explores an individual topic. A gallery may be devoted to an artist, a specific medium or discipline, a particular place in a moment in time or a shared creative idea. These presentations are conceived by teams of curators from all fields and at all levels of seniority collaborating closely to share expertise and viewpoints.

 

Jackson Pollock. One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8' 10" × 17' 5 5/8" (269.5 × 530.8cm). Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). Conservation was made possible by the Bank of America Art Conservation Project. © 2019 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

 

An ongoing program of frequent reinstallation will feature a wide range of artworks in new combinations—a reminder that countless ideas and histories can be explored through the Museum’s rich collection.

In the aftermath of World War II, a host of American artists with greatly varying styles and approaches were united by a belief in the power of abstract art to express personal convictions and profound human values. These artists, the Abstract Expressionists, were the first to push New York City to the forefront of modern art. Many of them sought to make the bodily gestures involved in the painting process visible in the resulting work. Jackson Pollock created all-over compositions by dipping sticks and hardened brushes into paint and moving his body above and around an unstretched canvas spread on the floor, allowing the paint to drip in skeins, splatters, and puddles that traced his movements.

 

Mark Rothko, No.6/No.22, 1950 (dated on reverse 1949)

 

Willem de Kooning, on the other hand, maintained references to the surrounding world. He took forms from life—like the human figure—as points of departure for abstraction and experimentation. Hedda Sterne, meanwhile, used spray paint to suggest the motion and speed of the New York highways that captivated her throughout the 1950s.

 

 

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