The Staatsballett Berlin Present 'Your Passion is Pure Joy to Me' by Stijn Celis and Half life by Sharon Eyal and Gai Behar

By Veronica Posth - Monday, October 22, 2018
The Staatsballett Berlin Present 'Your Passion is Pure Joy to Me' by Stijn Celis and Half life by Sharon Eyal and Gai Behar

"Your passion is pure joy to me" by Stijn Celis, choreographed on four tracks by Nick Cave and his band, The Bad Seeds, is a research over an eternal question: what kind of consolation is possible after infinite and miscellaneous catastrophes?

Image: Staatsballett Berlin by Tubal Battisti

 

Your passion is pure joy to me by Stijn Celis, choreographed on four tracks by Nick Cave and his band, The Bad Seeds, is a research over an eternal question: what kind of consolation is possible after infinite and miscellaneous catastrophes?

How the humankind is capable to proceed forward remembering tragedies happened in the past? The question rises up various and distressed reflections and leads to a personal internal voyage, resonant with additional memories and interrogations.The dancers, in their individual ways, seem probing and searching for answers. They move and use the whole space with stretched movements that all of a sudden become small. They lean over each other, just for a few seconds before they proceed alone in their solos.

 

Staatsballett Berlin by Tubal Battisti

 

In contrast with the deep voice of Nick Cave, some cacophonies by the composers Pierre Boulez and Krzysztof Penderecki make the piece even more dramatic. All the chosen music compositions are entangled with the unknown and incapacity to understand what is behind the seeable realities. The performers seem to fight with their own ghosts, fonts of inspiration and threat at the same time. Regrets, sorrow, wounds of different kinds emerge listening to the melancholic Nick Cave. The fugacious movements of the dancers that appear dancing, and disappear walking, bending and standing again, seem to be strongly connected to the human kind’s initial intention to understand and finding the true answers, and the actual recognition of that mere illusion followed by approximate, broken, various responses.

 

Staatsballett Berlin by Tubal Battisti

 

Then some questions come to mind such as, why the human being inexorably tries to find a reason to be? On which forces the humankind move on? Who finds the strength to go on? Why certain people can and others not? Consolation helps in certain circumstances and with some characters but it fails in many other cases. Many interrogations are triggered looking and hearing this piece that appears without a clear structure and without a clear content but that leaves space to ponder and get in touch with unbridle feelings. 

Half life by the two Israeli Sharon Eyal and Gai Behar is a triumph of energy.  Two dancers slowly come to be visible while the stage becomes brighter. Repeating the same robotic movements for a long time they appear artificial beings programmed to move with no ending nor changes. Once they are reached by a group of other dancers that also move strongly robotic, they all merge in creating an unit of semi nude sculpted bodies. Impressive the muscular figures that with a strong and synthesised rhythm, compress the movements looking like a block of resistant material. They are energetic, impetuous, full frontal.

The mental and physical power and strength of their bodies is visible and engaging while they seem proceeding as efficient machines. They recall images of soldiers on a front line ready to combat while repeating monotone but big, sharp and intense movements.

Staatsballett Berlin by Tubal Battisti

 

Getting really close in a magnetising condensed structure, they dissolve as they move away from each other stretching out the persuasive frame. It appears as they would need closure in order to get power to go on, as electronic devices need to be charged in order to function. When they gather and dance close to each other they look like amalgamated even if they still act as single units part of a big operating system. The creation per se seem not having a specific message but the aesthetic composition is impressive, the constant vigour remarkable and the might of the dancers outstanding.

Veronica Posth studied History of Art at the University of Florence and at the University of Glasgow. Specialised in Contemporary Art and Modern Museology she later gained a Master in Curatorial Studies and Exhibition Design between the Fine Art Academy of Florence and the University of Applied Sciences Potsdam. Since her University studies, she has been working on conceptualising exhibitions as independent curator and as art and dance critic, reviewer. After many years between London and Florence, she is now based in Berlin.

Telegram Channel

ArtDependence is now also available on the messaging platform Telegram. Telegram is a cloud-based mobile and desktop messaging app with a focus on security and speed.

Subscribing to the ArtDependence Channel allows you to easily stay up to date with the latest ArtDependence news.

Subscribe to the Newsletter

Image of the Day

Zhou Li, Blue – No.2, 2018, mixed media on canvas

Zhou Li, Blue – No.2, 2018, mixed media on canvas

Search

About ArtDependence

ArtDependence Magazine is an international magazine covering all spheres of contemporary art, as well as modern and classical art.

ArtDependence features the latest art news, highlighting interviews with today’s most influential artists, galleries, curators, collectors, fair directors and individuals at the axis of the arts.

The magazine also covers series of articles and reviews on critical art events, new publications and other foremost happenings in the art world.

If you would like to submit events or editorial content to ArtDependence Magazine, please feel free to reach the magazine via the contact page.